IUGR has various causes. The most common cause is a problem in the placenta (the tissue that carries food and blood to the baby). Birth defects and genetic…

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Yes, it’s possible to get pregnant any time from about three weeks after giving birth. This is true even if you’re breastfeeding and haven’t had a period yet….

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There is limited information about exposure to mold in pregnancy. Studies in animals have shown that mold can increase the chance of birth defects when it is eaten…

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If you are trying to conceive, consult your healthcare provider about whether you might need to start taking prenatal vitamins now; some experts recommend taking them at least…

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Water. Water is the single most important drink you should have throughout your pregnancy. You should drink at least six eight-ounce glasses of water per day, in general,…

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Miscarriage Frequency 10–50% of pregnancies Is a miscarriage a bereavement? Sometimes the emotional impact is felt immediately after the miscarriage, whereas in other cases it can take several…

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They can identify thousands of scents and remember them distinctly. When a woman becomes pregnant, her hormones surge, which may change her unique personal scent. Additionally, as her…

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However, some cheeses aren’t safe to eat, because they are more likely to grow bacteria such as listeria, which may harm your unborn baby. Soft, mould-ripened cheeses, such…

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Most experts agree that caffeine is safe during pregnancy if limited to 200 mg or less per day. This equals about 1–2 cups (240–580 mL) of coffee or…

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Apples. Apples are high in fiber and are a good source of vitamin C. Plus, they contain vitamin A, potassium, and pectin. Pectin is a prebiotic that feeds…

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